Smashing

Nicole Kidman De-Glams as a Gritty, Wrecked, Wracked L.A. Detective

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Destroyer
Starring Nicole Kidman & Sebastian Stan
Directed by Karyn Kusama
R

She’s one of the most strikingly beautiful women in the movies, but in her latest flick, Nicole Kidman looks like a wreck.

The star of TV’s Big Little Lies and such box-office hits as Moulin Rouge, Far and Away, Days of Thunder and The Stepford Wives de-glamorizes to the extreme in Destroyer as a damaged-goods L.A. detective whose life was derailed after a deep-cover sting operation took a very wrong turn.

Now Erin Bell is a hollowed-out shell of her former self, haunted by the tortured trauma of her past, when she receives an unexpected reminder of the very thing that ruined her life.

“Do you really want to go back down that hole again?” asks one of her fellow detectives.

Kidman here is something to see—because you’ve never seen her looking anything like it. Rail thin, with dark, sunken eyes, blanched skin and drab clothes that look like they’re hanging off a scarecrow, Erin Bell doesn’t appear to have bathed, brushed her teeth or combed her hair in weeks, maybe months. And it probably took a lot of Hollywood makeup to make it look like makeup isn’t something she’s thought about for a long, long time. As she squints and shuffles in the scorching, searing L.A. sun, she’s a piece of walking beef jerky. And she’s certainly just as tough. This beef jerky can bite back.

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Kidman & Sebastian Stan

Some 17 years ago, Bell was a fresh-faced sheriff’s deputy recruit assigned to a dangerous assignment with an FBI agent (Sebastian Stan) that involved infiltrating a ruthless criminal gang with a thing for robbing banks. But one big heist went horribly wrong, the gang’s murderous, cultish leader, Silas (Toby Kebbell), got away, and Erin’s never been the same.

Now, apparently, Silas has resurfaced, and she’s driven to find him and finish the job.

As she burrows into L.A.’s seedy, seamy underbelly looking for people and clues, we’re taken into the cracks and crevices where criminals crawl like vermin. We meet an illegal gun merchant, a dying jailbird, and a cocky, money-laundering lawyer (Bradley Whitford) who reminds the battered, burned-out detective that she’s already fought this battle before—and it didn’t turn out so well.

“You chose to play cops and robbers, and you lost, big-time,” he smugly tells her.

Exactly what happened, and what was lost, is explained in back-and-forth flashbacks. Director Karyn Kusama—whose previous films include Girlfight with Michelle Rodriguez, AEon Flux with Charlize Theron and Jennifer’s Body, starring Megan Fox—has created a stark, tense, bleak-looking film-noir crime-mystery character study that challenges viewers with multiple layers and tricky time-shift changes, especially as things bear down into the home stretch.

It also challenges its audience with a character whose “appeal” is in the sympathy it generates for her being so doggedly unappealing. She’s bitter, morose, wracked with guilt and doesn’t seem to have a friend in the world—at least not anymore.

Detective Bell can’t even get her rebellious teenage daughter (Jade Pettyjohn) to have a civil conversation. Her exasperated ex-husband (Scoot McNairy) longs for the life they might have had together. Her cop co-workers practically hold their noses when she walks by.

She does whatever it takes to do what she has to do—bashing heads with a gun barrel or a soap dish, bartering a sexual favor for a dollop of information, beating a bank robber to a bloody pulp then tossing her into her car trunk. It’s a Hollywood double standard that we’re accustomed to seeing guys—and guy cops—behave this way, but rarely women. It’s a down-and-dirty walk on the wild side that few actresses ever take.

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This isn’t really a movie to enjoy so much as to appreciate—for the skill of its storytelling, the craftsmanship of its filmmaking, and the performance and physical transformation of Kidman into something, and someone, eaten away from the inside by a cancer of regret, self-loathing, grief and an all-consuming need for vengeance.

You’ll probably feel a bit grimy and worn-out when it’s over, especially after the twisty-turn at the end that loops back on everything that’s come before. You may not be wrecked, but you could be due for a realignment.

Destroyer is no holly-jolly Christmas ride on the holiday express. But if you’re up for a gritty, grueling dive into a pummeling puzzle of bumps, bruises, gunfire, gristle, twists, turns, thumps, thwacks, slaps and surprises, climb on board.

Just be sure to bring your own soap, makeup and toothbrush.

In theaters Dec. 25, 2018

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